Spanish Influenza articles AA 1918-1920

Disease still 1918

MARGARET CHITWOOD DIES AFTER A SHORT SICKNESS

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 7 March 1918, 8. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19180307.2.96

Contributors: Elaine W

Monday morning Margaret Elizabeth, the little three-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Chitwood, died at their home on Eighth street after an illness lasting about a month and which developed into bronchial pneumonia. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock from Haugen’s chapel with Rev. Horace Taylor officiating and Mrs. A. B. Cook and Mrs. J. T. March furnishing the music. Interment was in Grand View cemetery.


LEVI W. CUMMINS IS DEAD AT 75

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 14 March 1918, 8. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19180314.2.87

Contributors: Elaine W

WELL KNOWN OLD-TIME RESIDENT PASSES AWAY FROM ATTACK OF PNEUMONIA.

Early this morning Levi W. Cummins passed away at the Anacortes hospital from an attack of pneumonia against which he had valiantly struggled for some time despite his seventy-three years. Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon this week at Haugen’s chapel at 2 o’clock with Rev. V. C. Evers officiating. Interment will be in Grandview cemetery. Mr. Cummins was born at Oswego, New York, seventy-three years ago last October. With his family he had resided in Anacortes for twenty-eight years and was widely known.


PUBLIC PLACES ARE CLOSED UP

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 10 October 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181010.2.2

APPEARANCE OF SPANISH INFLUENZA IN ClTY IS SIGNAL FOR CLOSING OF SCHOOLS, THEATERS, LODGES, ETC.

All places of public gathering were ordered closed Tuesday afternoon by order of the city council upon the recommendation of Dr. H. E. Frost, acting health officer. This action was taken in accordance with instructions from the state board of health dealing with the Spanish influenza whenever it makes its appearance in a town. There are two cases reported in Anacortes. The order affects the schools, the theaters, lodges, churches, pool halls, dance halls, and all other places of public gatherings. Mayor A. B. Cook was out of town Tuesday on a trip to Seattle. and before leaving appointed Dr. Frost to act as health officer. Immediately, when the presence of the case of Spanish influenza in Anacortes became known, Dr. Frost took steps to prevent its spread. Although he had the authority to give orders closing all places of public gathering, he asked the council to approve the action, and a special meeting was called Tuesday afternoon and the closing order was given out.

Let Children Out Doors The closing order will be in effect for a week at least, when it will be renewed or withdrawn according to conditions. Dr. Frost says that he thinks the week will be enough to avert an epidemic. It is urged that while children are not in school they should be permitted to be outdoors in the fresh air and sunshine as much as possible, though they should be prohibited from gathering on the streets or wandering about town. If necessary special officers will be appointed to see that they do not loaf about town and congregate. The theaters have willingly complied with the order and the managers expressed themselves as glad to do all in their power to prevent the spread of the disease. The order, however, makes it necessary for them to cancel important engagements, and the closing here and in other places disarranges their whole programs for a month ahead.


DRAFT MEN AWAIT ORDERS TO REPORT AT CAMP LEWIS

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 10 October 1918, 3. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181010.2.23

Contributors: Elaine W

Men in Anacortes and the county who were to have reported Monday to go to Camp Lewis received notice that their call to the camp would be postponed for a short time. While authorities say that there is no Spanish influenza at Camp Lewis, there are a great many cases of the ordinary influenza, and the men are not to be sent there until the influenza situation is well in hand, both outside and inside the camps, it is believed. The fifty men were to have gone to Camp Lewis this week are now awaiting further orders as to the date on which to report.


LOOK OUT FOR THE INFLUENZA

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 10 October 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181010.2.17

Contributors: KD

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH ASKS PEOPLE FOR VOLUNTARY QUARANTINE IF THEY HAVE GRIPPE OR A COLD.

The following statement in regard to Spanish influenza has been prepared by the Washington State Board or Health and is published at the request of Commissioner T. D. Tuttle: A good deal has been published with regard to the outbreak of “Spanish influenza” in our army camps and cities, especially in the eastern part of the United States. This disease is spreading very rapidly. We are frequently asked. "What is the probability of an outbreak of this disease in the State of Washington?" My answer is, the disease is already here. ’It has not assumed epidemic form as yet. Tt can be prevented from assuming epidemic form only by the earnest conscientious and intelligent help of every citizen oi the state. It is not deemed practical to establish quarantine for this disease. The means of preventing the spread of the disease are so simple that they are usually neglected, but we urge them upon each citizen and ask each man, woman and child in the state as a patriotic duty, as an effort to conserve man-power and woman-power, to practice the following simple precautions: 1. Never cough or sneeze without holding a handkerchief before your face. 2. Keep away from public gatherings and public places as much as possible. If necessary for you to go into crowded places get out as soon as possible. 3. If you have a cold, even the most simple cold, keep your face away from other people’s faces. Do not kiss the members of your family, and do not breathe directly into other people’s faces. 4. If you have any symptoms whatever of grippe stay at home. Do not visit others or permit others to visit you. Keep your windows wide open so that you may have an abundance of fresh air. If you do not promptly recover, or if you feel ill, call your physician. The above-mentioned precautions are extremely simple and yet if you will only consider for a moment, you will realize that we are asking you to practice voluntary quarantine instead of trying to put you under quarantine by law. We are asking you as a patriotic service to actually go into quarantine and stay there until all danger or spreading the disease is passed. Should the disease become epidemic in your community, it will be necessary to close all places of public gathering.


State Board of Health Directs Continuance of City’s Closing Orders

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 17 October 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181017.2.7

Orders were received today by telephone from the secretary of the state board of health instructing local officials to continue the order prohibiting public gatherings of all kinds until further notice from the state board of health. This means, says Dr. H. E. Frost, acting health officer, that the schools and theaters and all other places now closed will continue closed and that all orders now in effect will remain in effect until the state board of health gives the word for a lifting of the ban. Twenty-six Cases Are Reported There are about twenty-six cases of Spanish

influenza in Anacortes, says Dr. Frost. In no case in the city has it yet proved fatal. In one instance, however. the attack was very severe, it is reported, but the patient is improving. Schools Will not Open Monday The schools will not begin Monday as planned last week when the closing order was put into effect, and the day for the schools to resume their work will be announced when the word comes from the state board of health that the danger is over.

Preventive ls Recommended

Dr. Frost calls attention to a simple preventive for Spanish influenza which is recommended by the New York Medical journal. Put a tablespoon full of spirits of turpentine in a pint of water and keep it the mixture boiling on the stove. This says Dr. Frost, it would be wise for people in Anacortes to do. Posters on preventing the spread of influenza have been received by the Red Cross, and these are to be put up in public places as soon as possible.


DISEASE STILL IS INCREASING

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 17 October 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181017.2.8

Contributors: Elaine W

INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC CLAIMS ONE VICTIM IN COUNTY—MANY CASES REPORTED, BUT MOST ARE NOT SERIOUS.

Though there have been a large number of cases or Spanish influenza in Skagit county and though the number seems to be growing--about twenty-six developing in Anacortes alone in little more than a week--the majority of cases have not been severe. The first (LINE MISSING) influenza in the county is that of Carl Gustafson of Mt.Vernon who died Tuesday night. He was taken sick with the influenza Saturday and pneumonia followed it resulting fatally after but a short time. He was a well-known plumber in Mt. Vernon, 33 years of age, and he leaves a wife and young son. The disease has spread throughout the county, and there are many cases of it in Sedro-Woolley, Mt. Vernon, Concrete, and Burlington, as well as Anacortes. As yet not a great many cases have been reported in the smaller districts. The county health officer last week ordered all schools and public meetings discontinued throughout the county where the action had not already been taken by local health officials.


HEALTH ORDERS WILL CONTINUE

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 24 October 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181024.2.2

Contributors: Elaine W

BAN NOT TO BE LIFTED YET—NURSES ARE NEEDED—CASES TOTAL NEARLY 40 HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER NURSING.

The regulations now in effect with regard to the Spanish influenza will continue for the present. says Dr. H. E. Frost, acting health officer, and will be relaxed only upon word from the state board of health. Nothing can be said as to the date when the ban against public gatherings will be lifted. It is the plan now, says Supt. W. A. Jennings, unless the continuation of the ban makes it impossible, to open the public schools again Monday. Nov. 4. Announcement will be made next week. While there are nearly forty cases of Spanish influenza in Anacortes, and while a number of the cases are severe there have been no deaths from this cause in the city yet. The hospital is crowded with patients suffering from the influenza and the nurses are badly rushed. It is very difficult, says Dr. Frost, to get enough nurses to do nursing in this district, and a call is out for all available assistance in that line.

Pandemic Growing; Miss Verna Andrews, English teacher in the high school, is giving invaluable assistance during the epidemic. She has volunteered to do nursing, and while the schools are closed is putting her experience as a nurse to use. Instructions hare been sent out to Red Cross chapters from Washington to mobilize their forces to combat the influenza, working in conjunction with health departments. Efforts are being made here to enlist more nurses. Dr. Frost calls attention to an article in the New York Medical record for Oct. 19, in which it is stated that the influenza has spread to all countries throughout the world, even to South Africa, where in the mining district of Natal alone there have been 20,000 cases. The influenza there has been worse than any plague over known there. In New York City between Sept. 18 and Oct. 11 there were more than 25,000 cases. Authorities state according to the article, that a still further increase in the number of cases is to be expected, since from 30 to 40 per cent of the population are usually affected by the disease.


LIEUT. BRUETT BURIED TODAY

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 24 October 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181024.2.7

Contributors: Elaine W

BODY OF SOLDIER WHO DIED OF INFLUENZA AND PNEUMONIA AT CAMP JOHNSTON HERE FROM SOUTH.

The funeral of Lieut. Leo S. Bruett, who died of Spanish influenza and pneumonia at Camp Johnston, Florida, Oct. 18, and whose body arrived from the South on the noon train today, was held this afternoon. The Rev. Gustave Treunet conducted the services on the steps of the Catholic church, and burial was in Grand View cemetery. Officers of the Elks lodge were pall bearers. The plan to have an elaborate service with the Elks band to play a funeral march were abandoned on account of the influenza situation here. Mrs. Bruett, who was with her husband two weeks before his death, accompanied the body home. Lieut. Bruett had a rapid rise in the service. He enlisted in Oct., 1917, just a year ago, in the Quartermaster corps, and was stationed at Fort Worden. From there he was transferred to Camp Johnston, Fla. where he was promoted to sergeant, and then to second lieutenant. He was born at Beresford, S.D., losing his father at 18 months of age, and he lived there till he was 19. He taught school there a year after graduating from high school and then came to Anacortes where he took a business course, specializing in

bookkeeping. He was employed at the Great Northern station for six years, being promoted from general work to express agent, telegraph operator, and cashier. He married Miss Josephine Stover, an Anacortes girl, June 23, 1917. He leaves besides his wife, his mother, Mrs. J. B. Secor, his step father, and two brothers, Harold and Ernest. He was a favorite of everybody’s and was widely known in the city.


HUDSON’S BODY ARRIVES TODAY

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 24 October 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181024.2.5

Contributors: Elaine W

FUNERAL WILL BE HELD AT 2 O’CLOCK TOMORROW—HEALTH REGULATIONS PREVENT MILITARY FUNERAL.

The body of Nathaniel Inman Hudson, who died Oct. 17 of pneumonia at the aviation camp on Long Island, arrived at noon today front the East accompanied by a sergeant of his company, and the funeral will be held at 2 o’clock tomorrow afternoon. Hudson, who enlisted in the medical department or the aviation corps Nov. 9. 1917, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Hudson, and had lived here with his parents for nine years. He would have been 21 years old Nov. 20. He was taken sick with pneumonia and taken to the hospital Oct. 14, and died three days later. At first it was planned to have a military funeral under the direction of the Sons of Veterans, but the health regulations have made that impossible. The body will leave the E. E. Haugen chapel for Grand View cemetery and the only services will be held at the grave. The Rev. J D. Hudson of Seattle, formerly of Anacortes, will conduct the services. Inman Hudson was born in Wheatville, Fresno county, Cal., where the family lived twenty years. When he enlisted here he was employed by the water company. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Hudson. He was widely known in the city and had a large number of friends. Hudson was the first of the members of Camp 37 of the Sons of Veterans to die, and was the youngest member. The pall bearers will he members of that organization.


Error in Writing Brings Grief to Soldier’s Family

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 24 October 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181024.2.12

Contributors: Elaine W

(NOTE: Corrected spelling of Allyn MacDougall, per draft and SSI records)

An error in telegraphing the announcement of the death of a soldier at Camp Dodge, lowa, occasioned much uneasiness and grief among friends and relatives of Allyn MacDougal in Anacortes this last week. Mrs. George Cook, McDougal’s mother, last Tuesday received a telegram from the camp that S. R. McDougal had died there of influenza. She immediately wired back for a verification of the name and this was received, indicating that it was not her son. Friday she received another telegram stating that her son, Allen McDougal, had died and that his body was being shipped home. She made all funeral arrangements only to receive another telegram Monday admitting a mistake, and assuring her that her son was recovering from an

attack of the influenza. Tuesday she received a telegram from her son himself confirming the report of his improvement, and stating that he was then writing a letter home.


ANACORTES MAN TAKES SICK WITH INFLUENZA ON TRAIN

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 24 October 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181024.2.14

Contributors: Elaine W

Ray Trafton, who left last week with David Brisky for Gettysburg, Pa. to take a course of training in the tank corps, was taken to a hospital at La Crosse, Wis., with the Spanish influenza, according to word received by Mrs. Trafton. The Skagit county draft board also were notified that he had been removed from the train to the hospital, and was asked for instructions. Mrs. Trafton planned to hurry east to her husband, but almost immediately the news came that he was improving and was out of danger, so the trip was given up.


MEN OFF FOR FORT WORDEN

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 24 October 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181024.2.13

Contributors: Elaine W

FOURTEEN ANACORTES MEN ENTRAIN WITH TWENTY-NINE OTHERS FROM COUNTY TO GO TO ARMY POST.

Fourteen Anacortes men responded to the call into service Tuesday and left Mt. Vernon with twenty-nine others for Fort Worden. They reported at the county seat Monday afternoon, and a number of them were home again in Anacortes until Tuesday just before noon when they were to entrain. A number or business houses and offices in the city contributed important members and employees to this draft, and a number among those going left families here. Owing to the influenza there was no demonstration permitted in Mt. Vernon when the men entrained. The men called in this draft from Anacortes were Robert E. Stone, James Willard Kackley, Louis H. Unzelman, Ernest W. Pender, Jesse Randolph Haddon, Peter Olson Weie, Cleve A. Erholm, George V. Fredenburg, Fred H. Snyder, Frank R. Norvell, Paulus David Witner, Ernest D. Sather, Ashley C. Mondhan, and Philip G. Walker.


200 INFLUENZA CASES IN CITY

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 31 October 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181031.2.15

Contributors: Elaine W

THREE DEATHS TO DATE IN ANACORTES ARE RESULT OF EPIDEMIC - PREVENTIVE MEASURES ARE URGED.

Up to the present time there have been three deaths as the result of influenza in Anacortes. There are about 200 cases in the city, says Dr. H. E. Frost, city health officer. While today and yesterday the disease seems to have been a little slower in spreading owing to the steps being taken to prevent its growth in the city, still the situation is very serious, and requires all the cooperation that the citizens can give in keeping it from becoming worse. In the hospital are a good many cases, and the nurses have been kept extremely busy owing to the fact that two of them, Mrs. H. W. Rowley, who is in charge of the hospital, and Mrs. Louise Livesley have been ill with the influenza. They, however, are improving. Dr. Frost urges the citizens of Anacortes not to slacken in their efforts to stem the epidemic. Few realize the terrible effects the disease would have here if it were to gain the hold on the community it has in many places in the East. Citizens are urged to wear masks, to keep them clean and disinfected, to refrain from spitting, and as much as possible to remain at home and avoid crowds. J. F. Lyons today received a card from Philadelphia, Pa. which is being used there in the effort to curb the epidemic. In that city. the card states, 4,596 persons died in one week; fifty persons a day are being arrested for spitting; street sprinkling has been doubled. The card is printed in heavy black type and bears a skull and cross bones.


Health Department Urges Use of Masks

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 31 October 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181031.2.12

Contributors: Elaine W

Health Department Urges Use of Masks

Everyone is requested by the health department to wear an influenza mask. They are furnished by the Red Cross to anyone who will call at headquarters for them. While the wearing of masks by the general public is not compulsory it is urgent, says Dr. H. E. Frost, health officer. To make the wearing of masks effective, says Dr. Frost, they should be kept clean and disinfected. They should be boiled every night, and about every three hours a disinfectant should be put on the mask. It would be better not to wear masks than to neglect to keep them clean, he says.


SEVENTEEN YEAR OLD GIRL FIRST INFLUENZA VICTIM

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 31 October 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181031.2.11

Contributors: Elaine W

SEVENTEEN YEAR OLD GIRL FIRST INFLUENZA VICTIM

Ellen Jason. who would have been 17 years old Nov. 6, daughter or Mr. and Mrs. William Jason, died of influenza at the family home on 11th near J. Her death was the first in Anacortes caused by the influenza. The funeral was held at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon from the home and the Rev. J.H. Shields, pastor of the Presbyterian church officiated. Miss Jason was improving when a relapse set in.


TUG BOAT CAPTAIN DIES HERE OF THE INFLUENZA

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 31 October 1918, EIGHT. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181031.2.89

Contributors: Elaine W

TUB BOAT CAPTAIN DIES HERE OF THE INFLUENZA

Tom Miller, a tug boat fireman, who was taken to the hospital last week with influenza, died there Saturday morning. His body was shipped to Bellingham Sunday where his parents live, and where the funeral will be held.

Serviceman: Nathaniel Inman Hudson, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Hudson, who died of pneumonia Oct. 17 in Garden City, New York.

To the Microbe Muzzle

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 31 October 1918

https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181031.2.20

Contributors: Elaine W

By EUGENE AMMON

Oh you white mask of medicated gauze

That hint of ladies’ veils in old Stamuboul.

That hide the smile and kill the microbe ghoul

Obedient to the health department’s laws;

You Maxim silencer of barbers’ jaws

And silent preacher of the golden rule.

Like bold Horatius (talked about in school

To show the glory of a righteous cause)

Upon the bridge (of every nose) you stand,

A warder ’gainst the pressing microbe host

That swarm to pass you by on every hand;

You microbe muzzle, just make good your boast

And swat the Spanish flu bugs in the neck,

Then we will Croix-de-Guerre you too, by Heck!


Washington State Board of Health

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 7 November 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181107.2.5

Contributors: HH, Elaine W

Washington State Board of Health

Special Order and Regulation for the Prevention and the Spread of Influenza.

Pursuant to the authority vested in the State Board of Health of the State of Washington by the Constitution and Laws of the State of Washington, We, the State Board of Health of Said State of Washington, on account of the existence of an epidemic of influenza of a virulent character throughout the State of Washington creating an emergency and requiring the issuance of this order for the preservation of the public health, and the prevention of the spread of a contagious and infectious disease, to-wit, said influenza, do hereby order that during the existence of this epidemic of influenza (the termination of which will be evidenced by the revocation and cancellation of this order by the State Commissioner of Health), all persons shall wear good and sufficient gauze masks of dimensions of not less than five inches by six inches (5"x6") composed of not less than six (6) layers of surgical gauze of a fineness not less than “20-24" mesh, sewn and bound in order that the same may not come apart, and entirely covering the mouth and nose, in each and every of the following placers, to-wit: (1) All street cars, railway cars, busses, jitneys, cabs, boats, ferries, elevators, and other public conveyances; (2) All corridors, lobbies, hallways and other public places in all public buildings, office buildings, hotels and lodging houses; (3) All stores and other places where groceries, drugs and other forms of merchandise are bought and sold; (4) All offices and other places where persons deal with or transact business with the public; (5) All restaurants, cafes and other places serving food, except that the customers need not wear masks in restaurants, cafes and other eating places while actually engaged in eating their meals; (6) All places where food is prepared or offered for sale, whether such places are within buildings or not; and (7) All barber shops, laundries, wash houses, and dry cleaning establishments It is further ordered that during the existence of this epidemic the proprietors of all stores and other places where groceries, drugs and other forms of merchandise are bought and sold, and of all restaurants, cafes and other places where food is served, shall keep their doors open and their places well ventilated during the time that the same shall be open for the transaction of business; and that The crews of all street cars shall keep the same well ventilated by opening and keeping open at least one-third of the windows thereof, while such street cars are in use by the public. It shall be unlawful for any person to violate this order, or to neglect or refuse to obey the same. In witness whereof, and pursuant to the order of the State Board of Health, we have hereunto set our hands and official seal this 4th day of November, 1918. (Signed) J. R. BROWN President, Washington State Board of Health (Seal) (Signed) T. D. TUTTLE Secretary, Washington State Board of Health


TO INOCULATE CITIZENS FREE

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 7 November 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181107.2.12

Contributors: Elaine W

NURSES WILL BE STATIONED AT RED CROSS HEADQUARTERS T0 VACCINATE ALL COMERS—CASES MORE VIRULENT.

Free inoculation for Spanish influenza will he provided Anacortes people tomorrow at Red Cross headquarters. Dr. H. E. Frost, health officer, has arranged to have nurses at the Red Cross headquarters to inoculate those who may wish to take advantage of the opportunity. A supply of the vaccine has been received and general free inoculation is being adopted as one of the best means of hastening the eradication of the epidemic. There have been four deaths of influenza during the week. The cases of influenza now developing in Anacortes, says Dr. Frost, are of a more virulent character than the first. The epidemic seems to have come in a double wave, he says, and after what seemed to be a slackening there is present now a more dangerous form of the disease. Dr. Frost urges the continuance of all possible precautions and bespeaks the full cooperation of the public in the observance of the orders of the state Board of Health requiring all persons to wear masks.

Related to Plague

Dr. Frost urges rigid observance of that he has watched very closely the conditions point to the conclusion of the eminent European physician that announces there are two epidemics, one of influenza and the other of a diaease related to the bubonic plague. In one local case he said the lungs were not attacked while there was imminent danger of the disease attacking the brain and nerve centers. Dr. Frost urges rigid observance of all preventive measures in order to bring the epidemic to an end before it becomes worse. East of the Mississippi river it is worse than in the West, and in many places it is working deadly havoc. It is ravaging the west coast of Africa, and there are reports to the effect that chimpanzees and monkeys on the interior are dying of it in great numbers. In Chicago inoculation has been made compulsory and all school houses are being used, 100,000 a day being vaccinated.


CITY ATTORNEY DIES AT CAMP

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 7 November 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181107.2.2

Contributors: Elaine W

CITY ATTORNEY DIES AT CAMP

FRANK R. NORVELL, RECENTLY INDUCTED, PASSES AWAY AT FORT WORDEN, A VICTIM OF INFLUENZA AND PNEUMONIA.

News of the sudden and unexpected death of City Attorney Frank Robinson Norvell at Fort Worden came Friday as a great shock to his family and relatives and to the people of Anacortes. There was no intimation of his illness received by anyone here until the almost unbelievable message of his death came over the wire. He left Anacortes Tuesday, Oct. 22 and went from Mt. Vernon with the regular draft contingent to Fort Worden. He was in the best of health, and looked forward to his work in the army with the same spirit that always characterized him and made him a general favorite. During the epidemic of influenza which broke out at Fort Worden with great virulence he responded to the call for volunteers to assist in the hospitals as there was tragic need of helpers. He worked for twenty-six hours without sleeping, and then after but five hours rest continued his work for another twelve hours. He went to bed completely exhausted Wednesday night stricken with the influenza. Pneumonia set in Friday morning and he lived but a very short time after that. His death came so suddenly after he became ill that his family received no warning.

Elks Conduct Service.

He died as he had lived, sacrificing himself in the service of others. Glen Wilkens and O.C. Raymond, representing the Anacortes Elks Lodge, of which Norvell was Exalted Ruler, went to Port Worden on the Robinson company’s boat Challenge and returned Saturday with the hody. The funeral was held at 2:30 o’clock Tuesday afternoon in front of the Elks lodge. Officers of the. lodge conducted the services and Dr. J. H. Shields, pastor of the Presbyterian church, delivered the funeral sermon. The officers of the lodge who conducted the ritualistic funeral ceremony were W. F. Coulson, past exalted ruler, who acted as exalted ruler, O.C. Raymond, esteemed leading knight; L. E. Brown, esteemed loyal knight; Glen H. Wilkens, acting esteemed lecturing knight and secretary; C. L. Dwelley, chaplain; and J. A. Douglas, esquire. The pall bearers were Past Exalted Rulers H. C. Barney, C. E. Pickens, W. F. Coulson, and E. C. Kaune. During the funeral Anacortes business houses were closed.

Listed for Commission

The flowers were surprisingly abundant and beautiful, and there were many rarely fine floral pieces. Burial was in Grand View cemetery. Judge J. W. Norvell, father of the deceased, received a telegram the Judge Advocate General’s office in Washington, D.C. last week bringing the announcement that his son had been considered favorably for a lieutenant’s commission. On Wednesday another telegram came directing the young man to take an examination and be prepared to enter the service for immediate transfer to France, where he would he connected with the legal work of the army. This was signed by Judge Advocate General Crowder. Upon the heels of this announcement of the honor that had been conferred on the son came the news of the son’s death. Frank R. Norvell was born Feb. 13, 1890, at Fort Worth, Tex., his death coming at the age of 28. At Fort Worth J. W. Norvell, the father was practicing law. In 1892 the family moved to Fort Collins, Colo., where they lived until coming to Washington. Four or five months were spent in Seattle and Bremerton before the family finally moved to Anacortes in October, 1905. Frank Norvell was educated in Anacortes, graduating from the high school in 1911. While in high school he was quarterback of the football team and was recognized as one of the best quarterbacks in the state in spite of his light weight.

Stand High In Law

After graduating from high school he studied law with his father, and did so well under his able guidance that when he took the state bar examination in May, 1912, he passed first in a group of forty who were candidates for admission to the bar at the same time. He was elected city attorney the following December and served in that capacity from that time until his death. He became a

partner of his father and the firm of Norvell & Norvell has been held throughout this section of the state in the highest esteem. He joined the Anacortes lodge of Elks June 4, 1913, at the age of 23, and was regularly elected to and served in all the chair offices of the lodge, becoming exalted ruler April 1, 1918. Sept. 20, 1916, he married Miss Flora Matheson, daughter of Capt. and Mrs. J. A. Matheson. He leaves his widow, his father and mother, two brothers, J. D. Norvell of Seattle, and C. W. Norvell of Berkeley, Cal., and a sister, Mrs. E. D. Ball of Ames, Iowa. The funeral was delayed until the arrival of his sister.


VICTIM OF PNEUMONIA LEAVES THREE CHILDREN

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 7 November 1918, 8. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181107.2.84

Contributors: Elaine W

Mrs. Frances Rosamond Shaw died at the age of 41 last night of pneumonia following influenza at the family home at 5th and N. The funeral will be held Saturday morning, and the Rev. J. Fletcher Long, pastor of the Methodist church, will officiate. Interment will be in Grand View cemetery. The family recently moved from Montana. Mrs. Shaw leaves her husband, three children, and a sister, Mrs. Bogart of this city, a sister in Sedro-Woolley, and her parents in Mt. Vernon.


TEN YEAR OLD GIRL IS VICTIM OF INFLUENZA

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 7 November 1918, 8. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181107.2.77

Contributors: Elaine W

Margaret Colvin, 10-year-old daughter of Luke Colvin, died at the home of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Colvin, on Oakes avenue, at 1:30 o’clock this afternoon of influenza. She was taken sick Saturday with the disease. She has been living with her grandparents. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made.


LAWRENCE ALFRED NELSON DIES 0F THE INFLUENZA

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 7 November 1918, 8. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181107.2.76

Contributors: Elaine W

Lawrence Alfred Nelson died yesterday at the age of 21 after being ill with the influenza for nine days. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jonas Nelson, and was an engineer on a gas boat. The funeral was held at 10:30 o’clock this morning and the Rev. Roy Heeley, pastor of the Christian church, conducted the services at the E. E. Haugen chapel. Interment was in Fern Hill cemetery.


Untitled [Editorial by J. M. Post, editor]

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 14 November 1918 1 https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181114.2.31

Contributors: Elaine W

An election, perhaps to the city the most momentous of any ever held in Anacortes, will take place Tuesday, Dec. 3. While the candidates for city offices are without opposition and therefore occasion no issue, the question of whether or not the city shall purchase the water system makes the election one of great importance. The American will be glad to serve the people as a forum by throwing open its columns for communications on the subject, either for or against the proposition, provided they are signed and are not more than 300 words in length.

No more interesting study in psychology, either in the laboratory or in life, can be found than that presented Monday upon the reception of the, news of victory and peace. Anacortes’ people—and the same thing is true of the citizens of other cities—had been repressed emotionally and socially by the Spanish influenza regulations to the point of exhaustion. When the armistice news came the influenza restrictions were absolutely forgotten and the people threw themselves into the peace celebration with abandon. The interesting aspect of the whole situation is that they emerged from the celebration with an entirely new attitude towards the influenza. There was everywhere present an unexpressed but a perfectly obvious feeling that the mysterious power of the epidemic had been broken and that it was no longer to be feared. As it is not the purpose of an editorial of this kind to enter into a technical discussion of the psychology of the phenomenon, it will be sufficient to suggest that it is impossible for the human consciousness to entertain two antagonistic ideas at the same time, and that the victory idea was so large and dominating that the fear idea had to go.


INFLUENZA LID IS OFF AND THEATERS START UP—CHURCHES ANNOUNCE PROGRAMS FOR SUNDAY—DANCE IS ON.

Following the lead taken by the state board of health, the local authorities have removed the ban on public meetings which has been in effect since the epidemic of influenza began. The closing regulations were revoked today and tonight the theaters are opening up and a dance is scheduled at the Pavilion. While there have been deaths this week of the influenza, the epidemic seems to have lost its hold. There is still some danger, however, physicians say, and reasonable care should be exercised. Many citizens took advantage of the free inoculation at the Red Cross headquarters beginning last Friday, but the news of Germany’s acceptance of the armistice terms put a more effective end to the influenza epidemic -- psychologically at least -- as well as to the war. Schools of Anacortes will be open again Monday, announces Superintendent W. A. Jennings and all regular work will he resumed at the usual time Monday morning. Teachers who have been away are back ready for the opening, and plans are being made to lose no time when classes begin. The churches will resume their regular services Sunday, and the whole city will take up in usual routine of activity


WIFE OF CAFE PROPRIETOR DIES OF INFLUENZA AND PNEUMONIA LEAVING TWO-YEAR-OLD BABY GIRL.

Mrs. Herman Hunich died of influenza and pneumonia at the Grand View hotel at 8:20 o’clock Saturday night, after an illness of eight days. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock from the E. E. Haugen chapel. The Rev. George Loftness, pastor of the Norwegian Lutheran church, officiated. Burial was in Grand View cemetery. Mrs. Hunich, who was 28 years old at the time of her death, leaves a husband, who is proprietor of the Mt. Baker cafe, and a baby daughter Martha, two years and three months old. Mrs. Munich, who was Miss Wilhelmina Krodal, came to America from Bavaria, Germany, in 1915, arriving in Seattle June 29 that year. July 7 the same year she was married in Bellingham, and the next year came with her husband to Anacortes where they have made their home since.


MILL ENGINEER IS FLU VICTIM

18, EIGHT. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181114.2.65

Nov. 14, 1918

Contributors: Elaine W

THOMAS L. DANA SUCCUMBS TO PNEUMONIA FOLLOWING INFLUENZA—LEAVES TWO BROTHERS IN ANACORTES

Thomas Leach Dana, chief engineer at the Morrison mill, died of influenza and pneumonia Saturday at the Grand View hotel. The funeral was held from the E. E. Haugen chapel at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon. Burial was in Grand View cemetery. The services were conducted by the Rev. Roy Heely, pastor of the Christian church. Dana was taken sick Tuesday last week with the influenza, and when pneumonia set in he lived but three days. Dana was born at Parsons, Kans., Nov. 8, 1881. He came to the state in 1902, first going to Bellingham. He came to Anacortes five years ago as machinist in the employment of the Fidalgo Lumber & Box company. When the Old Oregon mill was bought he became chief engineer at that plant, where he remained until his death. Dana was a member of the Masonic lodge of Bellingham. He leaves two brothers in Anacortes, W. F. Dana, engineer at the Fidalgo Lumber & Box company’s mill, and George Dana; a sister, Mrs. Roy True of Everett; and a brother, Dave Dana, of Bellingham; also three half sisters, Mamie, Susan, and Hazel.


INFLUENZA TAKES MOTHER OF TWO DAYS-OLD INFANT

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 21 November 1918, FOF I:. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181121.2.56

Contributors: Elaine W

Mrs Frances Claire Bellevue, wife of Ernest Bellevue, died of influenza at the age of 21 at their home at 7th and J last Friday. The body was sent to Friday Harbor where the funeral was held Saturday. Besides her husband Mrs. Bellevue leaves three small children, one a baby but two days old at the time of the mother’s death.


MRS. GEORGE MERRITT DIES AT THE AGE OF 26

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 21 November 1918, FOF I:. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181121.2.55

Contributors: Elaine W

Mrs. George Merritt died at her home at 8th and Q Sunday night at the age of 26. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon from the chapel, and the Rev. A. I. Ferch, pastor of the Congregational church, officiated. Special music was provided by Miss Prudence Abbey and Miss Fanny Abbey. Interment was in Grand View cemetery. Mrs. Merritt was born in Alliance. Neb., 1892, and moved with her parents to Anacortes in 1903. She married George Merritt June 5, 1916. She leaves her husband. and her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Steven Curry of this city. and three brothers and four sisters.


GEORGE NEVILLE DIES AT HOTEL OF INFLUENZA

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 28 November 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181128.2.26

Contributors: Elaine W

George Neville, 27 years of age, died of influenza Monday night at the Vendome hotel. Neville, who has been employed by the Western Iron Works, has no relatives In Anacortes, and the remains have been shipped to Raburn Gap, Georgia, where the family lives.


HARVEY W. CURRY PASSES AWAY WITH THE INFLUENZA

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 28 November 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181128.2.8

Contributors: Elaine W

Harvey W. Curry, 40 years of age, died Friday night at the Vendome hotel of influenza after an illness of about a week. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Curry who live at 17th and O. The funeral was held at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon from the E. E. Haugen chapel, and the Rev. J. Fletcher Long, pastor of the Methodist church, officiated. The remains were interred in Grand View cemetery. Curry was a cousin of Mrs. George Merritt who died just a week before. He was born in Wauzeka. Wis., Nov. 12, 1878, and came to Anacortes eighteen years ago. Besides his parents he leaves one brother, Freeman Curry, and three sisters. Mrs. Pearl Hight, Mrs. Maude Ryan, and Mrs. Claude Sutherland.


Not a Case of Flu in City in 12 Days

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 5 December 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181205.2.5

Contributors: Elaine W

There is not a single case of influenza in Anacortes, and there has not been for twelve days, says Dr. A. B. Cook, the mayor. All the reports on the street to the effect that there is still influenza in Anacortes are false, he says. While Anacortes is free from influenza at the present time, elsewhere in the county more eases are appearing, and in Mt. Vernon and a few other places the schools are closed this week on account of it. The December term of court was cancelled in Mt. Vernon because of it.


ANNUAL MEMORIAL SERVICE HELD BY LOCAL ELKS LODGE

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 5 December 1918, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19181205.2.8

Contributors: Elaine W

ANNUAL MEMORIAL SERVICE HELD BY LOCAL ELKS LODGE.

LARGE CROWD ATTENDS IMPRESSIVE CEREMONY AT EMPIRE THEATER IN HONOR OF MEMBERS OF LODGE WHO HAVE DIED IN LAST YEAR—A. R. HILEN DELIVERS ADDRESS AND W. L. BRICKEY OFFERS THE EULOGY.

<<<Much text skipped>>

Bro. R. F. Warren died in the military service of his country, when the transport Tuscania was torpedoed by a German submarine off the British Isles. "Bro. E. L. Gerden died in the naval service of his country from influenza, at the naval training station at Seattle, Washington. "Bro. L. S. Bruett, died in the military service of his country, of influenza, at Ft. Johnstone Florida. "Bro. Frank R. Norvell, died in the military service of his country, of influenza at Ft. Worden, Washington. "Bro. C. A. Munks, died in the military service of his country of influenza at the training station, Pullman, Wash. "Bro. I. H. Barbee, died in the military service of his country of wounds received in battle, samewhere in France. “Bro. C. E. Burch, died in the military service of his country, of influenza, at the Presidio, California. “Bro. W. B. White died in the military service of his country, of pneumonia, somewhere in France.


CITY OFFICIALS ARE BANQUETED

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 9 January 1919, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190109.2.5

Contributors: Elaine W

CITY OFFICIALS ARE BANQUETED

DR. AND MRS. COOK ENTERTAIN CITY’S OFFICIAL FAMILY AT POST COUNCIL FEAST—WOMEN ATTEND THEATER.

In honor of the incoming city administration, Dr. A. B. Cook, retiring mayor, and Mrs. Cook entertained the city officials and their wives at a banquet in the Mt. Baker cafe at 11 o’clock Tuesday night following the opening session of the new council. Mrs. Cook was the hostess at a theater party of the women who attended the performance of "The Blue Bird" at the Empire during the session of the council. At the banquet Ben Driftmier presided as toastmaster. Dr. Cook gave a talk after which the toastmaster presented him with a monogramed jeweled Elk card case from the outgoing council to the retiring mayor. E. E. Haugen, the new mayor, and F. D. Cartwright both gave talks. Those present at the banquet were Mr. and Mrs. W. H. McCallum, Mr. and Mrs. Nick Bessner, Mr. and Mrs. Coleman Queen, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Trafton, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Marach, Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Carter, Mr. and Mrs. O. A. Lenning, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Haugen, Mr. and Mrs. F. D. Cartwright, Mrs. Marion Watkinson, Dr. and Mrs. A. B. Cook, and Mr. and Mrs. Ben Driftmier.

Jan. 16, 1919

Miss Laura Fisher, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Fisher, who has been ill at her home with the influenza, is improving.

Mrs. Lucy Bragg, who is conducting the Anacortes Hospital, spent all of last week at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Lee Neely, nursing Mrs. Neely, her husband and their two children who were all sick with the influenza.

Everyone was glad to see Miss Clara Knausenberger back in school Tuesday after she had been out four days with the influenza.


FLU SPREADING IN ANACORTES

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 23 January 1919, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190123.2.3

Contributors: Elaine W

PUBLIC URGED TO ASSIST IN PREVENTING NEW EPIDEMIC— BAN PUT ON DANCES, POOL HALLS, AND CHURCHES.

The spread of influenza in Anacortes in the last week, especially among the children, has become alarming, says Dr. H. E. Frost, acting health officer, and it has become necessary to call for the cooperation of the public in preventing a continued increase. After a consultation between Dr. Frost and Mayor E. E. Haugen it was decided today to put a ban on church gatherings, on dances, and on the pool halls, and to prohibit any person under 17 years of age from attending the theaters. This order goes into effect tomorrow, Friday. The schools have been closed for the remainder at the week, and if necessary will remain closed longer. The general public is urged not to go to public gatherings. Under the state law the health department is not able to quarantine for the influenza, and the cooperation of all is needed. Anacortes had a lower influenza death rate than any other city on the Sound during the epidemic, and this, it is believed by local health officials, was due to the prompt closing down of public meetings when the epidemic first started. The cooperation at the public is asked in the effort to keep down the disease. The responsibility for preventing another epidemic and the consequent increase in the death rate is placed upon the public as well as upon the health department.


Schools to Reopen Monday if Possible

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 23 January 1919, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190123.2.5

Contributors: Elaine W

Superintendent W. A. Jennings announces that in compliance with instructions from the health department the schools were closed today and will remain closed tomorrow, but that unless an extension of the closing order is necessary, school will begin again Monday morning. Pupils, says Superintendent Jennings, will be expected to go to school Monday. If the schools are to remain closed they will then be allowed to return home. This notion is taken to prevent the loss of any more time than is necessary in resuming work.


1918 LIBRARY LOANS SMALL

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 23 January 1919, 4. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190123.2.49

Contributors: Elaine W

1918 LIBRARY LOANS SMALL

LIBRARY PATRONS STOP READING AND KNIT FOR RED CROSS —BOOKS ACQUIRED DURING YEAR TOTAL 278.

The total number of loans at the public library during 1918, according to a report which is just being prepared by Mrs. E. Luella Howard. the librarian, was 11,882. This is a falling off from the 1917 tota1—14,897. Mrs. Howard says the decrease in the use of the library is accounted for by

the closing of the library for five weeks during the influenza epidemic, and by the greater interest taken among the women in knitting and other war work. During 1918, 206 books were bought for the library, 72 were given, making a total acquired, 278. The report also states that 149 were repaired, 74 were discarded, and that 324 new cards were made out for borrowers, bringing the total number of cards issued to borrowers since the library was opened eight years ago to 3,445. The eighth year of the library’s work ended Christmas, but the report is for the calendar year of 1918. At the present time there are 3770 books in the library, more than 3000 being on the shelves.


Second Semester To Begin Monday

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 6 February 1919, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190206.2.5

Contributors: Elaine W

School will begin again next Monday morning. After a little more than two weeks vacation on account of the influenza—a vacation that takes the place of the regular spring vacation—work for the year will be resumed. The first semester’s work has been completed, and Monday the second semester will begin. School sessions, it is planned, will continue the rest of the year without further interruption, and both teachers and pupils are planning through earnest work to make up for the time lost the first semester on account of the influenza.


INFLUENZA IN ANACORTES CLAIMS ANOTHER VICTIM

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 6 February 1919, PAG E THREE. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190206.2.22

Contributors: Elaine W

Frank Earthfield, 33 years old, died of influenza Monday night at midnight at the home of Christ Johnson, 20th and M, where he has been living. Earthfield had been sick twelve days, and the influenza developed into pnenmonia. The funeral was held this afternoon from the chapel, and burial was in Grand View cemetery. The Rev. George Loftness, pastor of the Norwegian Lutheran church, conducted the services. Earthfield came to Anacortes from Norway fifteen years ago. He is survived by a brother, George, who lives in Anacortes, and by his mother in Norway.


SHIPYARD WORKER, VICTIM OF FLU, BURIED SATURDAY

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 6 February 1919, PAG E THREE. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190206.2.21

Contributors: Elaine W

The funeral of George Merritt, the shipyard worker who died of the influeuza Wednesday night last week, was held Saturday from the E. E. Haugen chapel. Burial was in Grand View cemetery. Roy Healy, pastor of the Christian church conducted the services. Merritt was 26 years old and died after a few days illness. His wife succumbed to the same disease in November.


LOCAL AND PERSONAL

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 6 February 1919, FIVE. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190206.2.39

The Rev. A. I. Ferch, who has been critically ill with pneumonia this week, is reported slightly better. Pneumonia set in following influenza. Oher members of the family, who also were ill with the influenza are up.

ANACORTES HIGH SCHOOL MAY NOT ENTER DEBATES

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 6 February 1919, PAG E THREE. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190206.2.24

Contributors: Elaine W

It is likely that Anacortes high school will not enter the state interscholastic debates this year. The first debate, which was to have been held here tomorrow night between Anacortes and Sedro-Woolley, will not take place because Sedro-Woolley has dropped out of the debates, and the influenza in Anacortes has interfered with the preparatory work of the team. Such a short time remains for the debaters to get ready for the contests after school begins that it is thought probable that the school will not enter a team in the series.


PUBLIC LIBRARY ENJOYS BUSIEST MONTH BUT ONE

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 6 February 1919, PAG E THREE. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190206.2.23

Contributors: Elaine W

In spite of the influenza the public library during January was busier than ever before with the exception of one month. During January the library loaned 1622 books and received 56 applications for cards, bringing the total number of cards issued to borrowers since the establishment of the library to 3479.


16-YEAR-OLD GIRL PASSES AWAY WITH THE INFLUENZA

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 13 February 1919, TWO. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190213.2.22

Contributors: Elaine W

Miss Irene Elizabeth La Thorpe, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John La Thorpe, died Saturday night of influenza. She was 16 years of age. The remains were taken to Burlington Monday where the funeral was held. The Rev. Louis W. Steele, pastor of the Methodist church there conducted the services.


YOUNG MOTHER OF THREE DIES OF THE INFLUENZA

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 13 February 1919, TWO. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190213.2.15

Contributors: Elaine W

Mrs. Rachel Fulk, wife of Floyd Fulk, died Friday night of influenza at the age of 26. She leaves a husband and three small children. The funeral was held Sunday from the chapel, and burial was in Bay View. The Rev. J. Fletcher Long, pastor of the Methodist church, officiated.


Six Million “Flu” Victims

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 13 February 1919, TWO. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190213.2.19

Contributors: Elaine W

The medical expert of the London Times declares the influenza epidemic has proved itself five times deadlier than war. He estimates 6,000,000 persons have perished because of it during the last three months. It is estimated the war caused the death of 20,000,000 persons, the deaths from influenza for the same length of time would have run as high as 100,000,000. Never since the "Black Death," says the medical expert, as such a plague swept the world.

Feb. 13

C. F. Crout and family are up again after a siege with the influenza. Mrs. Ernest, Brado is sick at her home, suffering from a general break down. Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Thompson are around again after an attack of the influenza.


SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHER CONDUCTS BOY’S FUNERAL

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 20 February 1919, EIGHT. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190220.2.95

Contributors: Elaine W

Edwin Percival Weaver, the 12-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Weaver, died last Thursday night at the family home on 34th street of influenza. The funeral was held Sunday from the home, and burial was in Grand View cemetery. Sam Merritt, teacher of the boys’ class in the Sunday School of the Christian church, conducted the funeral services. Merritt is a neighbor of the Weavers.


YOUNG SHIPYARD WORKER SUCCUMBS TO PNEUMONIA

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 27 February 1919, EIGHT. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190227.2.80

Contributors: Elaine W

Carl Arthur Olson, 26 years old last July, died of pneumonia following influenza at his home, 1308 20th street, Monday night, and the funeral services were held at the E. E. Haugen chapel at 1 o’clock yesterday afternoon. Dr. J. H. Shields, pastor of the Presbyterian church, officiated. The remains were sent to Everett for burial. Olson was employed in the shipyard and is well known in Anacortes. He leaves a widow and two young sons, aged 4 and 2 years. Mrs. Olson has been ill with the influenza also and was not out of bed when her husband died. Besides the immediate family Olson is survived by a brother, Harry Olson, and two sisters, Mrs. Frank Peterson and Miss lda Olson, all of Anacortes. Olson was born July 27, 1892.


March 6, 1919

Superintendent W. A. Jennings has issued an appeal to parents to cooperate with the teachers in helping the pupils make up the work missed this year on account of the influenza. Pupils are to be given more home work during the semester and parents may do much to see that this work is done properly. This, in many respects is an opportunity for parents. Parents are too often apt to say “Let the teacher do it," and leave the whole responsibility of the development of the child’s mind to the teacher, because “that’s what the teacher is paid for." The teacher is paid to administer the community’s formal educational program and do what she can in a personal way to develop the children, and the teacher certainly earns her salary if anyone does. But for all that it is physically impossible for any teacher to give each of her pupils as much personal attention as every child ought to have. There is such a thing as giving a boy or girl too much of a certain kind of assistance, but there is a kind of help that a child can never get too much of, and this is the kind of help that a parent can give. The child ought to receive continued encouragement, and he ought to be taught how to apply himself to his work. He ought to correct bad habits of work, and he ought to acquire the invaluable habit of working hard and earnestly while he works. The parent can sit down and work with the child, being careful to avoid doing the work for the child that the child ought to do for himself, and this presents the best kind of an opportunity for the

parent to be really helpful in more than a temporary way. Such assistance from the parent also encourages the parent to become acquainted with the teacher and to cooperate more closely with her in dealing with the pupil. When parent and teacher meet with the proper attitude and understanding both may learn something of advantage to the pupil. If teacher and parent and pupil are brought into a relationship of clearer understanding because of the increase in the amount of home work assigned the pupil, the results will be of incalculable value.


April 10

The Rev. and Mrs. A. I. Ferch left Sunday night for Soap Lake where Mr. Ferch will receive treatment for his health. Since an attack of the influenza and pneumonia last winter Mr. Ferch’s health has continued poor and his physician has ordered him to Soap Lake. Mr. Ferch is pastor of the Pilgrim Congregational church.


DEATH BY HEART FAILURE FOLLOWS THE INFLUENZA

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 1 May 1919, FIVE. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19190501.2.48

Contributors: Elaine W

Ernest Oliver Robinson, who was left with a weak heart as the result of an attack of the influenza, died of heart failure suddenly in the garden at his home on the Whistle Lake road Saturday evening. He was 44 years of age. The funeral was held at 2 o’clock Tuesday afternoon from the chapel, the Rev. Harry Ferguson officiating. Burial was in Grand View cemetery. Robinson leaves a widow and two adopted children, a boy 10 years old and a girl 13. He is also survived by six sisters and four brothers, Mrs. W. L. Potter, Palouse; Mrs. T. E. Stone, Spokane; Mrs. H. H. Hanke, Spokane; Mrs. Leslie Martin, Seattle; Mrs. R. G. Billett, Anacortes; Miss Annabel Robinson, Anacortes; and Frank, John, Claude, and Clair Robinson all of Anacortes; and by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Robinson.


MANY CASES OF INFLUENZA REPORTED IN PAST WEEK

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 29 January 1920, 4. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19200129.2.32

Contributors: Elaine W

MANY CASES OF INFLUENZA REPORTED IN PAST WEEK

During the past week many cases of influenza have been reported in Anacortes, twenty-nine having been attended by local physicians Wednesday in addition to those previously under their care. Most cases are of a rather mild form and it is not believed that there will be many fatalities in case proper attention is glven patients. Reports from various parts of the Sound country are to the effect that the “flu" is very prevalent and that quarantine has been resorted to at the navy yard at Bremerton, However, these reports lack local verification.


NO PROFIT FOR THE PAST YEAR

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 29 January 1920, 2. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19200129.2.22

Contributors: Elaine W

ALASKA PACKERS ASSOCIATION’S ONLY REVENUE DURING PAST SEASON IS FROM OPERATION OF ITS LARGE FLEET.

That the 1919 cannery operations of the company showed no profits and that revenues of the year were derived chiefly from the operation of ships of the salmon fleet on commercial voyages, is the statement contained in the twenty-seventh annual report of the Alaska Packers Association, extensively engaged in the packing of salmon on Puget Sound and in Alaskan waters. The pack of 1919 of the company is given as 571,170 cases and 539 barrels of salt salmon. Profits for the year were $522,034.88. The company, according to the report, operated at the close of the year a total of ninety-four vessels, barks, one barkentine, two schooners and seventy-two steamers and launches. The bark Star of Poland, lost by shipwreck last year, is to be replaced as soon as a suitable vessel can he purchased. The report declares that relief government expeditions sent North during last year’s influenza epidemic were of no help. The association maintains six medical stations in Alaska where all employees and natives are given free treatment and free medicine. At the three Bristol Bay stations the resources of the association were put to a great strain during the influenza epidemic. Almost the entire adult native population was wiped out. The disease was raging at the time of the arrival of the salmon vessels and immediate relief measures were inaugurated on a large scale. Care of the sick and the orphans, feeding of entire villages, burial of the dead, cleaning and disinfecting native habitations, this, together with other sanitary work, was done in the most capable manner by the company’s superintendents, medical officers, nurses and all employees who could in any way assist, says the report. The statement declares that, continuing the policy developing Alaska, expenditures exceeding $230,000 were made along that line in the North last year.


DEATH ROBS FAMILY OF SON AND DAUGHTER WITHIN TWO DAYS TIME

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 12 February 1920, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19200212.2.2

Contributors: Elaine W

R. E. WOODBURN SUCCUMBS TO ATTACK OF INFLUENZA AND HIS DEATH IS FOLLOWED WITHIN SHORT TIME BY HIS SISTER, MRS. RUBY WOODBURN KACK FROM SAME DISEASE—BOTH WIDELY KNOWN AND POPULAR IN SKAGIT COUNTY.

R. E. Woodburn, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Woodburn of Whitney, passed away Monday evening. Feb. 9th, 1920, from the effects of influenza. R. E. was a name of Skagit county, and was twenty-eight years of age; he was married last Thanksgiving to Miss Naomi Pulliam of Mount Vernon and they since have resided at the beautiful Woodburn home near Whitney station. He has had charge of his father’s large farm for a number of years and was one of the most progressive farmers in the community. He was a young man of fine habits and most exemplary character and has hosts of friends throughout the county. Mr. Woodburn was a member of the Anacortes lodge of Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He leaves a young bride who is crushed with grief, besides being ill with influenza, is in a delicate condition, and was in the Burlington hospital until Monday, when she was allowed to go to her husband’s bedside, before he passed away.

Mrs. Ruby Woodburn Kack Dies.

Mr. Woodburn’s only sister, Mrs. Edward Kack, also passed away yesterday morning from influenza at the family residence here at 1107 3rd street. This is indeed a doubly hard blow to Mr. and Mrs. Woodburn to doom both their children within two days. Ruby Woodburn Kack was 29 years of age, a native of this county and was married to Edward Kack five years ago, and has since lived in this city, where she has many friends who were won by her quiet and loving manner. She had been ill but a short time with influenza. She was a member of Mount Erie Rebekah Lodge, in this city. The sympathy of the entire community goes out to the young husband, Mr. Kack, to Mr. and Mrs. Woodburn, and to the aged parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Ball, who sit silent and heart broken in their home on Tenth and L streets, this city. No funeral arrangements have yet been made, as both Mr. and Mrs. Woodburn and Mrs. Woodburn’s brother, Puget Ball, are all ill in the Woodburn home at Whitney.


"FLU" THREATENS TO CLOSE TOWN

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 12 February 1920, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19200212.2.14

Contributors: Elaine W

"FLU” THREATENS TO CLOSE TOWN

MANY AND INCREASING NUMBER OF CASES CAUSE HEALTH AUTHORITIES TO QUARANTINE MANY HOMES IN CITY

During the past ten days the number of influenza cases in Anacortes have increased at such a rapid rate that for a time it looked as though the health authorities must take action and close the schools and all public meeting places. Meetings were held by the health board and members of the city administration and the situation gone over thoroughly with physicians. However, during the first part of this week there was a material decline in the number of new cases reported, and so many of them were of a mild nature, that drastic action was not deemed necessary and, judging from indications at this time, there will be a continued diminuition of the epidemic. When conditions reached a stage where it was believed that a general closing of public places

would be the only safeguard against a genuinely serious epidemic many homes were quarantined in all parts of the city. It is the belief of physicians that this had a quick and highly beneficial effect in getting the situation under control by preventing the further spread of the disease. Many children remained away from the various schools, parents being aroused to the necessity of protecting them in every possible manner when indications pointed to their indisposition and consequent susceptibility to contagion. During the past two weeks physicians have hardly found time to sleep at all. New cases were reported to them with such recurring frequency and their services demanded at once that they were kept spinning from one part of the city to another almost constantly day and night. Druggists were also forced to disregard regular working hours in order to give proper attention to patrons. The worst is believed to be over now, however, but nothing is being overlooked that may tend in any way to further alleviate the situation.


VALENTINE DANCE CALLED OFF ON ACCOUNT OF INFLUENZA

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 12 February 1920, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19200212.2.7

Contributors: Elaine W

Notices have been sent out by Secretary Glen Wilkins of Anacortes Lodge No. 1204, B. P. O. Elks, calling off St. Valentine’s dance, which was to have been held this evening. No date for holding it has been decided on, but will be announced later. It was deemed advisable not to attempt to hold the dance at this time on account of the epidemic of influenza that is affecting so many people.

Feb. 26 1920

The city schools of Bay View and also of Conway, are among those that are temporarily closed down on account of influenza.

Al Tejan, who has been seriously ill for the past ten days with influenza, is able to be out again.

Walter Ginnett is quite seriously sick with influenza but is not considered in a dangerous condition.


OBITUARY

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 26 February 1920, 8. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19200226.2.67

Contributors: Elaine W

Samuel Lafayette Barnes was born in Sheridan, Iowa, August 1, 1868. On March 14, 1898 he was united in marriage to Miss Julia Fingleson at Fargo, North Dakota. Their family consists of five children, Gladys, Albert, Jesse, Elwood and James. Mr. and Mrs. Barnes came west with their family in 1906 and first settled at Seattle, later going to Samish Island. About two years ago they came to Anacortes and since that time have lived at Twenty-sixth and Commercial. Mr. Barnes has been more or less seriously ill ever since coming here, often being confined to his bed for considerable periods of time. A year ago last fall be surrendered his life to God and

experienced forgiveness of sins and that trust which made him ready either to live or die as his Master should desire. Monday evening Mr. Barnes was taken with influenza and the weakened condition of his heart was such that Thursday morning, at 7:20, he was released from further suffering and went, we believe, to be with his Savior. Besides his wife and the five children already mentioned, he leaves three brothers, Marion of Anacortes, James of Prescott, Oklahoma, and Leonard of Oregon. CONTRIBUTED.


CITY SCHOOL RECORD AFFECTED BY SICKNESS

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 11 March 1920, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19200311.2.15

Contributors: Elaine W

The effects of the flu epidemic are shown in the attendance records of the month which closed last Friday. The average figures for the past five months are 19,200 days present, 850 days absent, and an average daily attendance of 930. This past month the days present dropped to 18,311-1/2 and the total days absent rose to 1695. The average daily attendance the past month was 916.71. Miss Mullin returned to her room at the Nelson School Monday, after an enforced absence of five weeks. All the regular teachers are in school now with the exception of Miss Brown of the seventh grade at the Columbian School. Miss Brown went home last Friday with the flu but is expected back Monday.


LOCAL AND PERSONAL

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 11 March 1920, 5. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19200311.2.50

The Fidalgo Schools have been closed on account of the flu epidemic, but resume work again this week.

Mrs. W. V. Wells who has been suffering from influenza is improving and able to be about the house.


YOUNG MOTHER DIES AND LEAVES TWO SMALL BABES

Anacortes American (Anacortes, WA), 6 May 1920, 1. https://washingtondigitalnewspapers.org/?a=d&d=ANACAMER19200506.2.23

Contributors: Elaine W

Mrs. Curtis Allen, who formerly lived near 22nd and R streets, became mentally deranged recently, following influenza and after a few days the attending physician ordered her committed to the hospital at Sedro-Woolley, where she died Wednesday of last week. The case is an unusually sad one, in that she was alone, her husband being in Alaska working. He is the son of the veteran bridge tender, Charley Allen, at the Swinomish bridge and a good man, who will be crushed over his loss. Two babies are left motherless. Mrs. Allen was a daughter of the late Jos. Wetzel, near Burlington. Her funeral was conducted last Sunday and she was laid to rest in the Burlington cemetery.